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Inspiration

beautiful Ashtyn

By | Daily Life, Uncategorized | One Comment

My good friend, Lisa Harbertson Photography, took these photos of Ashtyn soon after we were released from the hospital following her bone marrow transplant. We knew Ashtyn’s hair would grow back and we wanted to capture her as she was at that moment. I am so grateful for these photos of my brave girl.

If you like these photos of my sweet girl, go to Lisa Harbertson Photography’s FB page and give her more LIKES, she is an amazing photographer…
https://www.facebook.com/lisaharbertsonphotography
You can also find her website at www.lisaharbertson.com
Below are her words and photos about Ashtyn…

“This is Ashtyn and I am blessed and lucky to call her my friend. I have known her since she was born. My husband and I met her parents when we moved next door into our first apartment as newlyweds. 14 years ago! We became bosom friends. When Ashtyn and her 2 siblings were babies and toddlers they filled up a big hole in our hearts caused by infertility. We loved them like our own children. Years have passed and life is busy, distance in miles has come between us, we have had 4 children of our own (hole in heart is gone thank you to the heavens!) – but we will ALWAys have a special place in our heart for these children. When Ashtyn was diagnosed with a rare form of leukemia this past February, our hearts were broken and humbled in prayer for this sweet girl. The things Ashtyn at 12 years old has endured will be more than many of us endure and overcome in a lifetime. Her current health and continued life has only come about with modern medicine and lots and lots and lots of prayers and faith. If you want to be inspired and strengthened, read her story in her own and her mother’s heartfelt words at Ashtyn’s Army.

Ashtyn was recovering from her chemo and bone marrow transplant and was barely home from the hospital when she asked me to capture her in photographs. I really have never felt more honored as a photographer. Not honored that I was asked, but honored that I had the privilege of spending time with her and photographing her at this significant moment in her life. She had beat cancer. Overcome the odds. Was living proof of miracles. When I was alone with her in the room I really felt like I was with an angel. I know that’s what an angel would be like. I asked her to write a few things on paper. She couldn’t write so I wrote for her. After all the pain, grief, and trial she’s endured, she told me to write, “God is Good.” What an example. She walked into my studio as feeble as a 95 year old lady. She had her throw up bag next to her the whole time. We took lots of breaks for rest. In the picture by the tree we were cheering and screaming “you beat cancer!!” – it took her all the energy she could muster to lift her arms up high. It was the middle of Summer and she was shivering with cold and needed a blanket. Yet! Yet here is this 12 year old girl, with a smile on her face and a true sparkle in her eyes. Angel Sparkle!! Like I said, lucky to know her, lucky to spend the evening with her.

I love you Ashtyn. You have made more of an impact on my life than you could ever know. Now you go girl and travel many more roads and watch many more sunsets! You Are Strong.”

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From Ashtyn

By | Daily Life, Looking Up, Spiritual, Trials, Triumphs, Uncategorized | 20 Comments

Beautiful AshtynI was Ashtyn’s scribe tonight as she shared some of her thoughts:

I don’t think Ethan and I, or Morgan and I, or Chandler and I, are going to fight much anymore.  We are closer now even though we aren’t together.  I feel it in my heart.  I can feel them with me.  I’m glad it’s me doing this instead of them.  It breaks my heart to think of them having to go through this.  I hope that none of my family members have to come here.  I don’t care if it’s an adult or kid, nobody deserves to be here.  It is the hardest thing ever.  I hate this place so bad.  It’s not fair.  If I saw family members here I would feel sad and it would break my heart.  I couldn’t stand it if Ethan had to go through this.  He wouldn’t be able to handle it.  I would hate to see Morgan have to go through it too.  She wouldn’t be able to handle it either.  Chandler would be able to handle it better than Morgan and Ethan, but wouldn’t handle it very well.  I am able to handle it because I know more about what leukemia is.  I know a little bit more of the routine here.  Before this, if you asked me if I could handle cancer, I would say “no.”  I couldn’t imagine it.  But now I know I am strong.  I know that I’m worthy of feeling the Spirit and feeling God.  He is the reason I can do this.  I think after I am done with this disease, things wont be so scary anymore.  Before this I couldn’t do shots. It would scare me to do doctor’s check ups.  But now shots are nothing compared to this.  A shot or a check up would be like the smallest thing compared to what I am going through here.

It’s scary here.  It is scary knowing you are in the hospital getting all this medicine and all the IV stuff.  It is scary having doctors concerned about you and talking about scary stuff.  They talk about a bunch of medicine.  They talk about the worst things that can happen.  The scale of things that can happen to me or my body is pretty big.  There are a lot of bad things that can happen.  I’m not talking death and stuff.  Bad things like infections that I can’t fight off, or fevers, or being here a long time.  The physical therapists tell me about what can happen if I don’t walk so it makes me want to walk everyday.  It scares me to walk because I might fall.  My muscles are so weak and aren’t working properly.  It’s hard to walk even a couple of steps to the bathroom.  I need to sit down a lot.  I can’t really move my legs very well.  When I walk in the halls with physical therapy I have to wear a mask that irritates my face that has a rash on it.  I don’t like when nurses and doctors talk about NG tubes.  It’s scary because if I don’t eat enough I will have to get one.  I really want my white blood cells to go up so I can eat and drink.  I really hope I get as big of an appetite as I can.

It’s hard to have the energy to play games.  Basically all day I watch TV, movies, and lay in bed.  I am trying to do all I can so I can take as little medicine as possible.  I don’t take pain medicine anymore for my mouth and throat.  I don’t like being hooked up to stuff.  After showers it feels good to not be hooked up to the IV pole with stuff going into me.  Laying in bed is not that comfortable.  I have to change sides a lot because it hurts my rash if I lay on one side for a long time.  The hardest part about being here is being away from family and knowing that I am in a hospital.  But what gets me through it the most is knowing that I will go home and that God will never leave my side.

It’s scary looking at myself in the mirror without hair on my shoulders.  Thinking about being outside and not having the wind blow my hair or having to pull my hair back kind of scares me.  Sometimes it makes me feel ashamed that I have to be here.  Shaving my head was one of the hardest things.  It made me feel awful.

Once there is hair on my head again, the disease is gone, and I don’t have to worry about cancer,  I will be a better person, sister, and friend.  If anyone goes through a hard trial, I sort of have more experience.  Whether someone is in the hospital or just having a bad day, I know most feelings now.  I know how it feels to suffer awful pain.  I know how it is to be mad about yourself.  I know how it is to be mad at God.  I know what it’s like to look in the mirror and turn away in shame.  I know what it feels like to be trapped, not able to go anywhere.  I know what it feels like to be weak.  I even know how it is to question if there is a God, if the church is true, and if the scriptures are true.  I remember being so sick and yelling at God for not helping me.  I’m kind of mad about being mad at Him because if He wasn’t here, and if I didn’t know about the gospel, I would… I just can’t imagine what it would be like.

I know there is a God and only one true God.  I love Him.  He comforts me everyday.  When I got chemo I couldn’t feel Him but I know He was and is there.  I am so grateful that I know the gospel is true.  I am grateful that I can be worthy to feel the Holy Ghost.  Now I have 100% more faith in Him.  I had a bad trial last year when my parents got divorced.  I thought that would be the worst possible thing that would happen in my life.  I thought I had so much faith and now compared to then, I have more faith than I have ever had.  I feel Him with me.  When I can’t feel Him, I hate it.  I just have to know that He is there, He loves me, and I will be OK if I have faith in Him.

How is this trial going to change me?  I think I will feel better about myself.  I’m going to be stronger.  I will be able to help people with trials and I will be able to give them advice.  I will be a better missionary.  I will have more faith and more love in my heart.  I will have a stronger testimony in the gospel and in Jesus.  I’m glad that someone knows exactly what I am going through.  Every pain and sorrow that I feel, Jesus Christ has felt it.  I am glad that I have someone to talk to because He understands everything.

What was I like before this trial?  I hated my hair.  I hated how it was thick and I had to straighten it everyday.  I should have been more grateful to even have hair.  Before this experience I felt like I was a wimp.  I couldn’t do sports very well.  I couldn’t get shots without freaking out.  I couldn’t stand the thought of needles.  I worried about the smallest things that really don’t matter anymore.  I didn’t have faith in myself.  I didn’t think I could do what everyone else did.  I thought I was bad at everything.  I thought I stunk at running.  I didn’t run the fastest, even though I wasn’t the worst.  I didn’t have faith when we were doing PE.  I didn’t think I could kick the ball far in kickball.  In my brain I would say “no” before I even tried anything.  I didn’t think I could talk to boys or new people.  I didn’t have much faith before tests and thought I would fail.  I thought I was ugly.  I thought I didn’t have cute clothes or cute shoes.  But now that I think about it, I had more confidence than I realized.  Looking back, I did talk to boys.  I remember conversations I had with them.  I remember talking to new people and even made a really good friend that was new this year.  I didn’t realize how many friends I had or how many people cared about me.  I always thought someone was making fun of me behind my back or talking about me.  I thought I was hated.  Now I realize I was worrying about stupid things that really don’t matter.  Once you are in the hospital and going through this, you realize what you had that you never recognized.  I think I never had confidence.  I never believed in myself the way I should have.  I didn’t think I could do anything right.  I didn’t have faith in myself.

After this I think I will have a completely different point of view in life.  I won’t care so much about how I look or how my hair will be.  I won’t try to impress people by being someone I’m not.  I will still care about friends and who I come in contact with.  I will have more faith in myself and know that I can do anything.  At school I will know that a lot of people care.  In PE I will probably be able to do anything that everyone else is doing.  I won’t say “no” before I try.  I won’t be so insecure.  If I do something wrong, it won’t be as big of a deal.  I will just know that I am beautiful.  I will know that I am strong.  I won’t doubt God again.  I will be able to trust Him more.  And I’ll probably not want as much junk food as I did before because now it all sounds gross. Ha Ha.

My mom told me today that when I was really sick (I can’t remember being so sick), I told her that my great grandma Holt, who passed away in November, visited me a couple times. In the post my mom wrote that I said “my great Grandma told me that everything is going to be okay.  She told me to have faith.  She told me to focus on today, hope for a better tomorrow, and know that God has my back.  She told me that I am strong.  She told me not to listen to what people are saying in my room because no one knows what my body can do like I do.”  Thinking that my great Grandma said those things gives me a little bit more determination to go home.  It is kind of like a boost to my spirit.  I believe angels are here guarding me and protecting me.  I can feel it.  I know dead family members have been with me.  They have protected me and helped me get through another day.  I know everyone’s fasts and prayers have helped me.  I probably sometimes don’t know how the prayers have helped me but I know somehow they have.

My rash hasn’t really improved yet but it hasn’t gotten worse.  I still can’t eat or drink much. My legs feel weak. My arms are itchy.  I know everyone prays for me and fasted for me Sunday.  I know the fast will help me soon.  I haven’t lost my faith by me not getting better right away.  I know eventually I will get better in God’s time.  Thank you for your support and for the fasting and prayers for me.  I know each person is helping me.  Each prayer has helped me be able to be stronger.

Life Is Good

By | Daily Life, Inspirational, Looking Up, Spiritual, Uncategorized | 10 Comments

Wednesday night was awful.  Ashtyn went to bed around midnight.  I turned the lights off close to 2:30 am, and at 4:30 am Ashtyn woke up and the only thing she could whisper was, “Mom, lay with me.” Sometimes she likes me to lay in her bed and other times she doesn’t   I asked her, as I often do, how much pain she was in on a scale of 1-10, 1 being no pain, 10 being the worst pain imaginable.  She softly said, “10”.  Ashtyn didn’t speak the rest of the night.  I am so grateful she knew what to say that gave me the insight into what she needed.  She needed me to lay in bed and help get her pain under control.  Throughout the night she had a low dose of morphine continuously going through her central line.  In addition to that dose she was allowed to press a button every 10 minutes that gave her extra amounts of morphine.  Ideally she is suppose to push the button on her own when she feels her pain getting worse.  Last night her pain was so intense she couldn’t even push the morphine button.  From 4:30 am until 9:30 am I laid beside her pushing her morphine button every 10 minutes.  I don’t think her pain level ever got below an “8” but at least pushing the button helped.  By 10 am the doctors came to her room and finally increased her maintenance morphine from 0.3 mg/hour to 1.0 mg/hour.  They also increased the amount of morphine from 0.5 mg to 1.0 mg every time she pushes the button.  On top of that they gave her an extra 4 mg dose initially just to get her pain under control.  With peace knowing she was feeling better, I fell asleep and slept until 1 pm.  Ashtyn slept until 3:30 pm.

When I woke up I felt emotionless, burnt out, and numb.  I felt nothing.  I was just existing in a small room by myself with nothing to feel.  A nurse informed me that while I was sleeping a friend had brought her therapy dog to see Ashtyn and another friend had stopped by to say hi.  Miraculously messages and texts started coming from Ashtyn’s Army.  My cousin and his wife from the DC area sent me an email voucher for a 2 hour house cleaning service.  My sister Alisa called to tell me she was going to stop by soon and bring me lunch.  Ashtyn received a bag of gifts from Jason’s work.  Jeni dropped by a box of valentines from Ashtyn’s elementary school.  Two separate youth church leaders brought Valentine’s cards.  Messages of encouragement continued to come from the blog and Facebook.

Are you kidding me?  Have we forgotten how good this world is?  Have we been fooled to think there is no compassion and love left?  Has the negativity of our times clouded our eyes making it difficult to see all the positives?  Does bad seem to dominate good?  I don’t believe for one second that the power of good isn’t running rampant around the world.

With Ashtyn’s Army, how could I not immediately feel full?  How could Ashtyn not completely feel loved?  The power of Ashtyn’s Army is strong.  Some day soon I will write a post on the miracles Ashtyn’s Army has brought into my family’s and Ashtyn’s life.  It’s incredible.

I am so proud of Ashtyn today.  She struggled with such pain from mucositis and never cowered away.  In all her misery she allowed me to help her with a shower.  Even though she threw up in a blue plastic bag while in the shower, she pressed forward.  Ashtyn brushed her hair and teeth and did her oral care with mouth wash.  She forced herself to swallow two pills morning and night that aren’t available in IV form.  Can you imagine swallowing anything let alone pills with a completely raw throat?  Under the direction of the nurse, Ashtyn let me do her sterile dressing change for her central line and she even helped me take off the sticky tape of her old dressing.

Today her temperature ranged from 101.6 to 104.4 degrees.  In the last couple of days the nurses have drawn blood to test if Ashtyn has an infection.  I am not surprised that her blood cultures have not grown any bacteria.  For now the thought is her temperature is a natural response to the chemo and mucositis.  Referring back to my post “Nowhere I’d Rather Be” I shared,  “ I believe she did have an infection of some sort, and whatever infection she had was healed using the power of God.”  I still believe had she not received a blessing from her Stake President on Tuesday night, her blood cultures would have come back positive for an infection.  But for now, she is well.

At 5 pm I was feeling good.  Jason had come up after work to be with Ashtyn and the love and support from Ashtyn’s Army surrounded us.  The doctor came into the room with a smile on her face and said, “I have news about the lab work.  Chandler has been matched and is able to be the bone marrow transplant donor for Ashtyn.”  What an amazing moment that was for us.  I immediately called Chandler.  He reacted like a boy receiving an Xbox for Christmas.  God is so kind.  Referring to my post “I Could Not Have Planned It Better Myself” I wrote,  “From the moment I felt a bone marrow transplant was likely, I have always thought it would be Chandler who would be the donor.”  In that same post I wrote of the dream Ashtyn’s 10 year old sister Morgan had, “…They compared my tube with Ashtyn’s.  It was not a match.  They compared Ethan’s tube with Ashtyn’s.  It was not a match.  Then they compared yours (Chandler) with Ashtyn’s and it was a match.”

There are many different explanations that can be said about our previous feelings and comments.  It can be said to be a coincidence, a lucky guess, or intuition. To me it doesn’t really matter what others call it.  For me I call it revelation.  “Revelation is communication from God to His children.  This guidance comes through various channels according to the needs and circumstances of individuals and families.  According to our faithfulness, we can receive revelation to help us with our specific personal needs, responsibilities, and questions.”  Morgan had a dream.  I had a quiet spiritual prompting.  Cool!!!

I started the day feeling empty with no emotions and ended the day full of joy.  I love my life.  Yep. I LOVE MY LIFE.  Even living in the hospital, watching my daughter suffer in pain, not knowing what each day will bring other than a lack of sleep and constant medical procedures.  I am away from Chandler, Morgan, and Ethan whom I adore.  I no longer live the life of carpooling, gym, tending my nieces, friends, family time, and being at home.  I am grateful for the life that God has handed to me.  We have a Heavenly Father who cares and has a plan for us. We have a Savior who understands completely and lightens our burdens.  I have four remarkable, special children.  I have friends, family, and Ashtyn’s Army that are raising me up everyday.  Life is good.

Fortifying and Gathering Reinforcements

By | Daily Life, Inspirational, Trials, Triumphs, Uncategorized | 7 Comments
We Can Do Hard THings

These cancer bugs with X’s over them are from Ashtyn’s Grandma Poulsen. They are hung in front of Ashtyn’s bed to remind her that she can do hard things and destroy her cancer.

OK Ashtyn’s Army, we are all fortifying our battlefields and preparing for war!  I can feel it! Ashtyn’s Army is increasing in number, strengthening in faith, and rallying in service.  Comments are being heard, prayers are being offered, hearts are being touched, love is being poured out, visits are adding strength, efforts are gathering, children are being taught, adults are growing, friends and family are uniting, and together we are going to kick this cancer’s butt!

Ashtyn’s Army is doing all they can to strengthen her by utilizing their own strengths.  All efforts are empowering and uplifting.

Ashtyn will continue to have visitors come daily to help strengthen her.  One visitor will help guide Ashtyn to her happy place to find peace and hope.  Another will provide music therapy to sing out anger and joy.  Others will come for girl talk.  She will have those who will massage her and provide essential oils.  Pictures will be taken of milestones, dark times, and triumphs.  There will be times for the calm spirited visitors to sit beside her, providing comfort and not requiring anything from her.  Other times she will have visitors that bring laughter.  Words of encouragement and purpose will come.  There are those who will bring in food that she can tolerate.  Already there has been tranquil music, inspiring talks, funny stories, letters written, and uplifting gifts brought.  She’ll continue to read comments and see support on Facebook and her website.  Purpose has been given to Ashtyn knowing that this trial is not a waste of time.  She will know that her pain, struggles, and sacrifice will not be in vain because of the stories being shared of lives already being changed.

Family Army

Laughing with Kristi and Natalie
Family Army

Opening Letters From School - Friend and Community Army

Opening Letters From School
Friend and Community Army

Nurse Entertaining Ashtyn

Nurse Entertaining Ashtyn
Medical Army

Ashtyn is doing her part in preparing and fortifying too.  She is putting on her armor of strength, determination, independence, confidence, perspective, acceptance, and is starting to take charge.  She is being raised up by your prayers and is getting ready to rock this thing.

HER DETERMINATION:  For 12 hours today she forced herself to eat. Every bite was a bite she didn’t want to take, but she did it.  No way was she going to let some stupid NG tube win.  Every day she will tolerate different food.  A great deal of effort was made to provide her with food she could handle.  After much trial and error, this is what she ate today:  cheesecake for breakfast, a cup of homemade creamy potato soup from my friend Angie, a few bites of Ice Cream, one Trader Joe’s yogurt, 32 ounces of rootbeer, a bowl of Top Ramen, one entire cup of noodle soup, a small Red Mango, and ½ can of Sprite.  She did not throw up once! I am guessing close to 1500  calories again.  Way to go Ashtyn!!!!

HER INDEPENDENCE:  She doesn’t get nervous when I leave the room.  When an aide came to weigh her today she made sure to remind me that she needed to wear the mask to go in the hall.  Ashtyn informed me when she needed to brush her teeth. (The appearance of her tongue is changing however no mucositis yet.  Keep praying that she won’t have to deal with the pain that mucositis causes.)  Though there was no desire for a shower tonight, Ashtyn pushed through her fatigue and showered because she knew that showering every other night is important.  She makes sure that the food she eats is correctly written on the dry erase board.  She does her own eye drops and walks with her awkward IV pole on her own to the restroom.

HER CONFIDENCE:  Ashtyn is now able to talk about the future of when she loses her hair without crying.  She is going to pray and ask, since she’ll suffer the loss of her hair, if He would bless her that her hair will grow back straight instead of curly.  Ashtyn has accepted as best she can that she does have cancer.  She now can hear the words “cancer” and “chemotherapy” without falling into a depression.

HER PERSPECTIVE:  Contemplating cancer and the support she has received she said “At the end of this, I will know how many people care.  If I hear that someone else has cancer, I’ll know how they feel and can help them.  I don’t want to work here because I don’t want to see kids in pain, but I’ll volunteer.”

HER ACCEPTANCE:  Last night she asked, “Am I going to be here for a month?”   I paused and admitted, “Yes you will be.”  The tears came, but only for a brief moment as I explained why she has to stay.  “The doctors are trying to get you home for good as soon as possible.  They figured out the best way to accomplish that goal is to put you on different chemotherapy drugs that I can’t give you at home.  You’ll get the chemo for 10 days.  After 10 days you will be done with the chemo but will have to stay in the hospital 20 more days just to make sure you don’t get sick.  You won’t have any ability to fight infection so you’ll need to stay in your clean hospital room to stay safe.”  Miraculously she was quite calm and accepted it.  I remember only a few days ago how distressed she was at the thought of staying for more than a few days.

After only eight days of being in the hospital, Ashtyn has become noticeably stronger mentally and emotionally, preparing for when she becomes physically weaker.  She has done remarkably well during her first four days of chemotherapy, giving her time to build determination and confidence in herself that she can fight this. Only because of your prayers and support could she have done so well. Thank you.

We Can Do Hard Things

My friend Lisa made one of these posters for Ashtyn and one for my other kids

“I can do all things through Christ which strengtheneth me.”  Philipians 4:13

The Beginning…

By | Daily Life, Inspirational, Trials, Uncategorized | One Comment

Wednesday January 30th started with a prayer. “Heavenly Father, thou knows Ashtyn has missed school and has been sick for a couple of weeks.  She has been pale and has had very little energy.  Last night my mom called to pass on a message from my dad that he really feels Ashtyn needs to see a doctor.  You know how my dad is.  He isn’t much of a talker but when he does, he speaks with wisdom.  You know how I am.  I think she just has a flu that she still needs to recover from.  Please help her to get better or tell me what to do. In the name of Jesus Christ, Amen.”

And off we went as usual.  I drove Chandler (13 yo) to Butler Middle School at 7:40 am, picked up my adorable nieces Millie (3 yo) and Ruby (1 1/2 yo) from my sister Alisa to babysit for the day.  Went back home, fed kids breakfast, and hopped in the car at 8:30 am to take Ashtyn (12) and Morgan (10) to Canyonview Elementary.  Ethan (6), Millie, Ruby, and I went back home, got ready for the gym and headed to XCEL Fitness.  At 11:30 am I was ready to head out of the gym when I got a phone call from Canyonview Elementary School telling me that Ashtyn wasn’t feeling well and needed to be picked up.  My heart raced in a way it never has when I get a sick call from school.  My sister Jen was at my side and with a worried face I said, “I’ve got to get Ashtyn to a doctor.”  She asked, “Do you think she could have Leukemia?”  “Yes.” I answered.

When I walked in to the sick room at the school Ashtyn was laying on the bed.  After a few days of protesting a doctors visit, with tears in her eyes she said,  “Mom, I think I need to see a doctor.”  “I know sweetie.”

I got a phone call from Chandler letting me know he didn’t feel well and asked if I could pick him up from school.  “Perfect timing, I will be right there.”  By this time it was 12:10 pm.  Ethan’s school started at 12:15 pm so I dropped him off to Kindergarten at Butler Elementary. With urgency in my heart, I dropped Chandler, Millie, and Ruby to my moms and headed for the Insta-care with the knowledge that Ashtyn needed blood work done to find out if she has mono or Leukemia.

We sat in the waiting room for about an hour and once it was Ashtyn’s turn to see a doctor things started happening with no delays.  Ashtyn was truly terrified  when it took three painful needle sticks to get blood work.  The results quickly came back with a very low White Blood Cell count and low hematocrit. I called Jason to let him know we were heading to Primary Children’s Hospital.  It was 2:30 pm. Jason just so happened to be off work driving home and his dad just so happened to be 5 minutes away and headed to my house to give Ashtyn a blessing. ** I have never believed in “just so happened”.  There are constant tender mercies from God all around us everyday showing us his continual and constant hand in our lives.** I drove Ashtyn home, got her in comfy PJ’s, grabbed her favorite blanket, Justin Beiber pillow and a few other things.  Lorin, Jason’s dad, gave Ashtyn a blessing.  I don’t remember a word he said but it doesn’t matter. I know the power of the Priesthood is the power of God and blessed Ashtyn with what she needed at that time.

Once we got to Primary Children’s hospital at 3:30 pm things happened quickly.  The ER took every blood test they needed, but she was calmer with the needle sticks than she was at the insta-care.  Ashtyn: “I trust them more here.”  We first met with the NNP who talked to us about cancer.  We then talked to the Hematologist who also was leaning towards cancer.  Ashtyn was hearing about cancer when we didn’t even know she had it.  In my mind I wasn’t going to assume she had anything until tests came back.  As far as I knew, maybe she had a severe virus and yes maybe it was Leukemia, but I didn’t want to jump to any conclusions.  By 7:30 pm Ashtyn was taken to the 4th floor and given a room in the ICS Immunocompromised floor.  Ashtyn was scared. She wanted to know what was wrong with her.  She didn’t want cancer.  She didn’t want to be in the hospital.  She wanted to be in school. (“What? You never want to be in school. How perspectives change.”) She wanted to be home.  However she felt how I felt, nervous for the unknown but peace in the heart.

Once settled the visitors came and so did her smile, and even her laugh.

We will face this challenge with upbeat spirits.  There will be times for crying, anger, fear, frustration, doubt, and anxiety. There will also be times for peace, happiness, smiles, calmness, and fun.

James E. Faust, “Everybody in this life has their challenges and difficulties. That is part of our mortal test.  The reason for some of these trials cannot be readily understood except on the basis of faith and hope because there is often a larger purpose which we do not always understand. Peace comes through hope.”